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What is Blue Waffle Disease?

What is Blue Waffle disease

A 2010 Internet hoax warning of a fictitious STD that turns the vagina blue (blue waffle disease). The prank made national headlines when a council person in New Jersey cited it as a new and imminent threat to a woman’s health.

In that the prank caused such panic and dissatisfaction, it illustrates how easily misinformation can spread, jeopardizing not only a person’s peace of mind but also their understanding of the nature and risks of real STDs.

Do Blue Waffles Exist?

There is no such thing as blue waffle disease. A fake disease was created in 2010 by internet pranksters. The article is an example of the types of internet hoaxes designed to mislead readers for sowing misinformation, phishing, selling quack products, soliciting charitable donations, or simply being malicious.

How the Hoax Started

It all started as a bait-and-switch meme. Using an image of a blue waffle, the pranksters challenged users: “Bet you can’t find me on Google image search.” A photograph of blue-tinted, apparently diseased labia was found by those who fell for the bait. Waffle is a slang term meaning vagina, which is why the name was given to the product.  

The pranksters described the disease as sexually transmitted and said that it caused lesions, itchiness, burning, and a smelly discharge that resembled those of STDs such as gonorrhea or chlamydia. Rather than being doctored, there is a greater possibility that the blue vagina was stained with gentian violet. 

Despite medical evidence debunking the myth, social media panic was unabated. It has been argued that if left unattended, blue waffle disease could ultimately turn one’s body blue.

Intentions & Consequences

However silly or benign the prank may seem, the true aim was to sow alarm and distress-and it succeeded. As a result of these hoaxes, a phenomenon is known as “Munchausen by Internet” has developed in which people fabricate illnesses to gain attention or taunt others.

There is also a pervasive narrative suggesting that sexually active women are “abnormal” and will suffer the consequences of their actions. In the end, blue waffle disease only affects women, not men.

Sexually Transmitted Diseases

Many of the symptoms of blue waffle disease are similar to those associated with STDs in women, which is one reason why the hoax fooled so many people. Symptoms related to:

  • Bacterial Vaginosis- A “fishy” smell, redness, swelling, and itching in the vaginal area, bleeding during sex, and itchiness in the vaginal area.
  • Chlamydia- Pain with urination, lower abdominal or pelvic pain, pain with intercourse, bleeding with sex, bleeding between periods, redness, swelling, itching in the vaginal area.
  • Gonorrhea- Itching, redness, and swelling of the vaginal area, vaginal discharge, pain with urination, pain with intercourse, bleeding during sex, bleeding during periods.
  • Genital herpes- Symptoms of vaginal redness, swelling, itching and burning, painful vaginal blisters and sores, and vaginal discharge.
  • Human papillomavirus- Irritation in the vaginal area and painless warts.

Getting Tested for STDs

A lot of times, STDs do not cause symptoms. Even if you do not display symptoms, if you use condom less sex or have other risk factors, you are still at risk for STDs.

Whether you have symptoms or not, ask a health care professional if you think you might have been exposed. In the end, you can only detect an STD if you are tested. You can also ask the health professional about when to get tested so that you don’t do so during the “window period” when false-negative results can occur.

United States women are advised to get tested for STDs by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):

  • Sexually active women under 25- Gonorrhea and chlamydia
  • Sexually active women 25 and over with risk factors- It is also recommended to have annual gonorrhea and chlamydia screenings.
  • Pregnant women- Screening for syphilis, HIV, and hepatitis B is recommended early in pregnancy, as well as for gonorrhea and chlamydia for pregnant women with risk factors.
  • All people 13 to 64 years- A routine medical visit should include HIV testing at least once.

Source : Very Well Health

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Written by Saleh wasim

Blogger who writes topics such as Employment, News, travel, sports, events and life in Gulf.

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